Should you take your child to the chiropractor?

Should you take your child to the chiropractor?

It’s a good question, and it’s one Dr. McSweeney hears often. The short answer is yes, it’s a good idea to take your child to the chiropractor. And that’s because children, like adults, have spines and nervous systems, and it’s important that we take care of them properly. It may even be more important during developmental years.

Between tumbles on the playground, those heavy backpacks, injuries from sports and play, even just sitting all day long at a school desk, kids are exposed to any number of physical stress. And all of them can take a serious toll on a growing kid’s spine and nervous system. Combine that with the constant growing and developing your child does, and you can see why spinal check-ups are worthwhile.

Think of the body’s central nervous system – that’s the brain and the spinal cord – as its fuse box. A blown fuse somewhere in a child’s body can result in symptoms such as:

  • Bedwetting
  • Constipation
  • Ear infections
  • Disrupted sleep patterns
  • Headaches
  • Growing pains
  • Asthma

But instead of treating these symptoms themselves, chiropractic focuses on the subluxation, or the blown fuse, that’s preventing the nervous system from doing its job.

Usually, parents take their child to the chiropractor because of a physical trauma like an injury. But it’s emotional and chemical stress can have an impact on a child’s nervous system too, and these are just as worthy of a spinal check up.

A child’s spine will generally respond much faster than an adult’s spine, with just a few adjustments needed to restore normal function. If your child has a compromised immune system or health condition, then a few visits will likely be enough to strengthen the body. A healthy, active kid would benefit from a spinal check-up every three months or so.

You can schedule a visit for you or your child with Dr. McSweeney to see if chiropractic care is a good fit. She’ll be happy to answer all of your questions.